Gruppenausstellung – All About Lies

Gruppenausstellung – All About Lies

Apartment Project, an art initiative producing contemporary art projects since 1999, presents ‘All About Lies’ bringing together work – paintings, drawings, videos and objects  by 60 participants from different disciplines to be exhibited in its 23m2 space.
In the exhibition brochure the project’s  coordinator Selda Asal describes it briefly:

When you stay abroad for some reason or other people usually prefer to ask you questions about politics rather than trying to understand your exhibition or talking about art. This is the moment when Turkey – a country that has made a rule of giving evasive answers – weighs down on you with all its sins and good deeds. Things we were taught, that were transmitted to us, things we learned through our own efforts, those we learned from writers we trust, things we know, the many things that are veiled etc. etc..a complex process lies, truths, slight truths, lightened truths, strategically reformulated truths, presupposed truths.

This exhibition is about expressing, being able to articulate lies, pretens and illusions we are always entangled in at the points they touch us.

In a two and half month June, July, August 2006 studio workshop, entitled “All About Lies”, sixty two participants from different disciplines and countries used varying approaches to explore concepts about lies and/or the fake. When the workshop images and texts, dealing mainly with political lies from Turkey in the 1980s, were adhered to the walls, floor, ceiling, and windows, the space became illegible and chaotic.  This created confusion did not just refer to a political situation, it also included personal situations, social environment and even experiences from strange, confused, blurred family interactions common in Turkey during the 1980s when it was necessary to refrain from presenting individual expressions strongly or openly. The project coordinator, Selda Asal, commented on the show by saying, ”I tried to use chaos and confusion to lose the trace of what I was saying, but at the same time to say what I wanted to say.” Both the content and form of this exhibition related to misrepresentation.